Liver stiffness regression after successful Hepatitis C treatment is independent of HIV coinfection. | Fundació Lluita contra la Sida

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Liver stiffness regression after successful Hepatitis C treatment is independent of HIV coinfection.

01/03/2019

Autors: Malin JJ, Boesecke C, Schwarze-Zander C, Wasmuth JC, Schlabe S, Trebicka J, Spengler U, Llibre JM, Jou A, Vasylyev M, Clotet B, Rockstroh J.

Revista: HIV Med.

OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to assess the regression of liver stiffness after successful direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatment in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) monoinfection and HCV/-HIV coinfection. In addition, we aimed to identify factors associated with liver stiffness regression.

METHODS: We studied patients treated with interferon-free DAA regimens with a sustained virological response at week 12 (SVR12 ) or 24 (SVR24 ) post-treatment. Liver stiffness was assessed by transient elastography (TE) before the initiation and after the end of treatment (median 12 weeks).

RESULTS: Of 214 enrolled patients, 85 (40%) were HCV monoinfected and 129 (60%) HCV/HIV coinfected. Baseline median TE values were 7.8 kPa [interquartile range (IQR) 5.9-12.0 kPa] in mono-infected patients and 10.7 kPa (IQR 7.8-17.0 kPa) in coinfected patients. Overall, the median TE value decreased from 10.1 to 6.8 kPa (n = 214; P < 0.0001). There was no difference between mono- and coinfected patients (-2.2 versus -3.3 kPa, respectively; P = 0.88), which was verified by an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) adjusting for baseline TE values. Significant (≥ 30%) regression of liver stiffness was achieved by 45% of patients (54% with baseline TE ≥ 7.1 kPa). In multivariate analysis, a prior HCV treatment was a negative predictor of liver stiffness regression [odds ratio (OR) 0.31; P = 0.001]. A higher baseline TE value was positively associated with achieving a significant regression (OR 1.06; P = 0.02). HIV coinfection status, HCV genotype, age, sex, treatment duration, controlled attenuation parameter value, bilirubin concentration, platelet count and aspartate aminotransferase concentration were not associated with liver stiffness regression.

CONCLUSIONS: Regression of liver stiffness after successful DAA treatment did not differ in patients with HCV monoinfection and those with HCV/HIV coinfection. Half of all patients achieved a significant (≥ 30%) regression. Prior treatment for HCV was a negative predictor for this endpoint, while a higher baseline TE value was positively associated with regression.